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The Tripping Point in Leadership: Overcoming Organizational Apathy [eBook]

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Facing the Facts
The word apathy is an unfriendly and threatening word to most people, and that is probably the reason I never hear executives use the word to describe problems within their organizations.


Instead, I hear the listing of symptoms, such as:


- burnout
- stagnation
- indecision
- lack of creativity
- lack of motivation
- lack of productivity
- and so on. . . .Read More Below

The Tripping Point in Leadership: Overcoming Organizational Apathy [eBook]

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Apathy: A Natural, Human Instinct

I had just finished my introductions in front of more than 70 top executives of an international organization when I made a shocking and somewhat risky statement. I told them that all the organizational problems they had identified on their introductory worksheets were merely symptoms of the same universal problem — apathy. The individual annual incomes of this group ranged from $250,000 to $500,000, and I had just told them they were apathetic! At least that is what they heard. I quickly asked them to withhold their judgment for a moment, and give me a chance to explain before collectively deciding that a high-priced development expert had just insulted them. As a hush fell over the room, I began to verbally review the general list of people problems that they had provided for me prior to the meeting:

- indecisiveness - lack of drive - lack of creativity - lack of focus - stagnation - burnout - imbalance - the list went on and on.

This was their list, not mine!

I paused for a second and just looked at them. Then I asked each executive to write down the following developmental definition for apathy:

A natural, human instinct, common to us all, that consistently encourages us to seek a comfort zone in which nothing ever changes. Pens began to move across legal pads. After a few moments, I asked the group this question, "How many of you know someone in your current organization who is impeded by this description of apathy?" The entire group raised their hands in unison. Then I asked the hard question, "How many of you have, at some point, suffered from this same description?"

You could hear a pin drop.

Finally, one person started laughing and courageously raised her hand. Her actions stimulated other colleagues to raise their hands, and the entire room broke into laughter of genuine confession. Facing the Facts The word apathy is an unfriendly and threatening word to most people, and that is probably the reason I never hear executives use the word to describe problems within their organizations.

Instead, I hear the listing of symptoms, such as:

- burnout - stagnation - indecision - lack of creativity - lack of motivation - lack of productivity - and so on.

These symptoms may sound more professional, academic, clinical, or forgiving, but symptoms, if worked on exclusively, lead an organization on a wild goose chase, fixing symptoms but never solving real problems!

Comfortable with the Truth

Apathy is a very useful and effective word for me now after years of experience. In fact I have learned that until a person gains an awareness of how the forces of apathy work to impede effectiveness, behavioral change and improvement are out of the question. Awareness begins with an understanding of apathy as a natural, human instinct common to us all. Usually when someone is called apathetic, he or she is being accused of indifference. But the working definition I am using for apathy has little to do with indifference. It has everything to do with describing the relationship between the basic motivation of security and the natural, human instinct described as apathy. Take a close look at my working definition of apathy:

A natural, human instinct, common to us all, that consistently encourages us to seek a comfort zone in which nothing ever changes. Now, ask yourself this question, "What is one of humankind's basic, motivational drives?" According to Maslow's famous book, A Theory of Human Motivation, most all human behavior can be traced back to the basic motivation of self-preservation and security. Some may be motivated by higher-level needs, but as soon as their security is threatened, they quickly revert to self-preservation. This process of seeking security and building unproductive comfort zones, if left unchecked, leads to behaviors that are usually described as the causes of people problems and ineffectiveness.

Additional Information
Author David Byrd
Publisher Next Century Publishing LLC
Publication Date No
ISBN 9781939268716
About the Author David Byrd, author of the best-selling book, The Tripping Point in Leadership and highly praised executive leadership development coach, outlines his Next-Level Achievement System® in this his third book, Achievement. David has devoted over 30+ years to the study of people and achievement, especially next-level growth. Helping leaders and their organizations get to that coveted next-level has been the cornerstone of his life’s work. Now, along with confirmation and comments from one of his top clients, Mark Smith, he describes the simple but comprehensive elements of his system for all of us.
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